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Finding your tribe

Your vibe will attract your tribe.

For the longest time I waited for my tribe. Someone who complemented my personality and wanted to do everything with me. Many failures have passed and eventually I just thought fine, I’ll go it alone. Now of course, my best friend, is currently in Australia and I believe she helped me grow in more ways possible. She is to me, the catalyst of who I am today. So when she left, I was left to find a tribe again. I did it the same way I did before. I traveled for a bit, and gave out my true energy, never faking it, and now my tribe is slowly coming together. People I feel comfortable with, people who energize me rather than drain me, and people who are ready for any adventure that comes our way.

The Everyday Adventure

If you’re reading this, chances are you have a passion for travel, an intrinsic need to gain new experiences, and the willingness to learn more about this world. We aim to fill our lives with plane tickets to exotic destinations, backpacking trips through historic cities, and journeys up mountains with indescribable views. Funnily enough, no one ever talks about the time “in-between.” The time spent working crazy hours to fund these trips, the mornings spent forming ideas, the nights spent sharing stories of trips taken elsewhere, and of course… the days spent seeking adventure in small, simple ways.

Yes, you read that right. An adventure doesn’t have to be across an ocean, it can simply be found down the street. It’s the appreciation of the finding the “new and exciting” in everyday life. It’s the split second decision to change the “plan” and play mini golf in heels in 90 degree weather instead of shopping in a mall. It’s the mindfulness to try every item on the menu of the restaurant you love, or its dropping all sense of familiarity and trying a whole new place all together. It’s getting to know someone new, making a friend, sharing a story. It’s recognizing when someone you love needs inspiration and discovering news way to reach them. It’s taking a leap of faith, when maybe you don’t have much (or any) to begin with.

If you think about, and I mean really think about adventure cannot be defined. It has no set time or place. It’s meaning is fluid, omnipresent and more often than not, occurs “in-between.” So make sure not to wish this time away, enjoy the process of deciding where to go next, reorganizing life, or adjusting back to your job. Because the reality is that our world is full of wonder, and we are privileged enough to be woven within this universe. So let’s keep our eyes open and believe in the adventure of life with our entire heart.

Travel Gap

I was on the couch one day with my Grampa. I had just returned from Europe. He says “I don’t understand why you women are always out of the house now. Always doing something.” I say “We are catching up on the years we couldn’t.”

“Fair enough,” is his response.

I haven’t traveled everywhere yet, but there’s time and I frequently use books to fuel my travel obsession. Yet there’s something that I’ve noticed that continues to bother me as I wander through the Barnes and Nobles travel section. This week looking for Miami and Thailand information. Where’s all the books from women? I find a total of two.

-Wanderful, a book about how to look good in various cities, i.e, Stevie Nicks type wraps in New Orleans. (P.S. having been to NOLA I don’t suggest those type wraps on Bourbon Street or Jackson Square)

-We’ll always have Paris, a book I can only assume is about the enigma that is the famous city and one girls romance with the city or a man or both.

This week I settle with the books Havana by Mark Kurlansky and Travel as a Political Act by Rick Steves. But I’m still perplexed. What is the system that is making it so there aren’t more books written by women in travel? Or simply more books of substance by women? Women have stories to tell. Especially about travel. Are women simply not writing about their experiences? Or are they being written and told by a publisher that unless it coincides with the typical gender expectations that it won’t make it to the shelves. The female gender has made it past the point of being able to write only home and garden type columns, or what to wear to fit a certain body type.

Now it may sound like I am bashing the women who have books on the shelves. My response is no I’m not. I am simply stating that the whole picture of female travel is incomplete. Yes, there are women who go to these places and make it a top priority to look good, you can take a look back to when I had photoshoots done in Paris and Barcelona. But there are also female travelers who run around wearing the same pants for days on end, whose hair is matted into dreads and has blades of grass wrapped inside. There are women who travel with children and raise families on the road while being a digital nomad and supporting her two loves. These are stories that could inspire an entirely different group to see the world.

Women have stories and they should be heard. In the past 5 years I have had the pleasure of meeting a variety of female travelers, they create their own maps and guides. Women who have sailed around the Caribbean at eighteen, women who have hiked to Machu Picchu, women that pack up and move to Japan all while raising a child, and women that move to Australia just because her instincts told her to. To miss out on these stories is to miss out on half of the big picture. We are out there and we are seeing the same countries as men, but from a woman’s perspective the same country could be a different world altogether.